Archives > February 2019

IAAW’s President & Founder featured at the #newram

The new Royal Alberta Museum which opened its doors last October 2018 houses a large variety of Indigenous artifacts.

 

Pahpamiyhaw asiniy (Manitou Stone). Photo courtesy of The National Post

 

Some of the artifacts include the Manitou Stone, unearthed tools over thousands of years old. Included among these artifacts are the stories of outstanding Indigenous Albertans throughout history.

 

Muriel Stanley Venne at the Indigenous Women’s Justice Forum 2018. Photo Credit: Pink Star Photography

 

Muriel Stanley Venne, the president and founder of IAAW is among one of those that are honoured through a display.

 

Among the items displayed includes one of Muriel’s signature hats, her various awards for her humanitarian and activist work, and her framed Order of Canada.

 

 

The text reads as follows:

Muriel Stanley Venne: Human Rights Defender, Social Activist, Truth Speaker

 

As a child, she could not understand why her Métis grandmother was treated disrespectfully. As a wife, she was left for dead in an alley.

 

As a woman, she founded the Institute for the Advancement of Aboriginal Women (IAAW). She also established the Social Justice Awards. Muriel Stnaley venne stands up for the missing and murdered. She fights racism and obstacles to equality for Aboriginal women. “We have reclaimed this beautiful word, Esquao, Cree for woman, to eliminate forever the ‘s’ word”, she says.

 

Don’t forget to check her out in the Natural Human History section of the museum! Free entrance is available for First Nations, Métis and Inuit people.